The pardnoers tale essay

Traveling down the road, they meet an old man who appears sorrowful. In his sermon, he always preaches about covetousness, the very vice that he himself is gripped by.

Next, he attacks drunkenness, which makes a man seem mad and witless. First and foremost is gluttony, which he identifies as the sin that first caused the fall of mankind in Eden.

They must transport the gold under cover of night, and so someone must run into town to fetch bread and wine in the meantime. He could easily be the richest man in town, he realizes, if he could have all the gold to himself. He argues that many sermons are the product of evil intentions.

By preaching, the Pardoner can get back at anyone who has offended him or his brethren. He says his sorrow stems from old age—he has been waiting for Death to come and take him for some time, and he has wandered all over the world.

He goes to the apothecary and buys the strongest poison available, then puts the poison into two bottles of wine, leaving a third bottle pure for himself. At first, they are speechless, but, then, the slyest of the three reminds them that if they carry the gold into town in daylight, they will be taken for thieves.

Wanting to cheer up, the Host asks the Pardoner to tell the group a merrier, farcical tale. The Pardoner agrees, but will continue only after he has food and drink in his stomach.

After getting a drink, the Pardoner begins his Prologue. The old man directs them into a grove, where he says he just left Death under an oak tree. He argues that it so offends God that he forbade swearing in the Second Commandment—placing it higher up on the list than homicide. The rioters are outraged and, in their drunkenness, decide to find and kill Death to avenge their friend.

They lived gluttonous lives of sin, worshipping the ways of the devil.

The rioters rush to the tree, underneath which they find not Death but eight bushels of gold coins with no owner in sight. Once upon a time there were three young men who lived in Belgium who liked to live on the wild side.

The youths, hearing the name of Death, demand to know where they can find him. His one and only interest is to fill his ever-deepening pockets. And then the thin and shapely dancing girls and the young girls selling fruit and the singers with their harps and the whores and women selling sweets would come over to them to seduce them and encourage them to sin—which is so easy for gluttons to do anyway.

They draw lots, and the youngest of the three loses and runs off toward town. His sermon topic always remains the same: The second rioter agrees, and they prepare their trap. He returns to the tree, but the other two rioters leap out and kill him.

After almost two hundred lines of sermonizing, the Pardoner finally returns to his story of the lecherous Flemish youngsters. In Flaundres whylom was a companye Of yonge folk, that haunteden folye, As ryot, hasard, stewes, and tavernes, Wher-as, with harpes, lutes, and giternes, They daunce and pleye at dees bothe day and night, And ete also and drinken over hir might, Thurgh which they doon the devel sacrifyse With-in that develes temple, in cursed wyse, By superfluitee abhominable; 10Hir othes been so grete and so dampnable, That it is grisly for to here hem swere; Our blissed lordes body they to-tere; Hem thoughte Iewes rente him noght y-nough; And ech of hem at otheres sinne lough.

He is shocked at the death of the young Roman girl in the tale, and mourns the fact that her beauty ultimately caused the chain of events that led her father to kill her. After commenting on their lifestyle of debauchery, the Pardoner enters into a tirade against the vices that they practice.

They partied, gambled, visited brothels, and went to bars where they stuffed themselves with food and wine and danced all night and day to the music of harps and lutes and guitars.

He tells the company about his occupation—a combination of itinerant preaching and selling promises of salvation. The Pardoner admits that he preaches solely to get money, not to correct sin.

Finally, he denounces swearing. Amanda Padron November 19, Period 2 The Canterbury Tales Essay Geoffery Chaucer wrote twenty-four tales but the most noticeable of these twenty-four tales are “The Pardoners Tale” and “The Wife Of Baths Tale”.

Essay on Irony In the Pardoners Tale  Irony in “The Pardoners Tale ” Irony is a literary technique characterized by a contrast between what is written and what is to be understood by the reader. The Pardoner’s Introduction, Prologue, and Tale Fragment 6, lines – Summary: Introduction to the Pardoner’s Tale.

The Host reacts to. Once upon a time there were three young men who lived in Belgium who liked to live on the wild side. They partied, gambled, visited brothels, and went to bars where they stuffed themselves with food and wine and danced all night and day to the music of harps and lutes and guitars.

The Pardoners Tale Essay Examples. 28 total results. Love and Betrayal in the Story of Joseph and Geoffrey Chaucer's The Pardoner's Tale.

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Pardoners Tale Essays (Examples)

2 pages. An Analysis of Deception and Foolishness in Pardoner's Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer. 1, words. 3 pages. The Irony in the Pardoner's Tale. Essay on The Pardoner's Tale of Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales Words | 6 Pages The Pardoner's Tale of Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales is a structured novel which starts with the narrator obtaining twenty traveling companions at an inn.

The pardnoers tale essay
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